Shallow geothermal energy in fractured basalt; a case study from Kollafjørður, Faroe Islands, NE-Atlantic Ocean

Óluva R. Eidesgaard, Niels Hemmingsen Schovsbo, Lars Ole Boldreel, Jana Ólavsdóttir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A shallow (≈200 m) geothermal energy system is examined in the Faroe Islands, a 60-million-year-old volcanic archipelago in the Northeast Atlantic. The geothermal water has a heating capacity of approximately 150 individual households and consists of meteoric water approximately 3 years old. Water temperatures as high as 27 °C in artesian wells are explained by a topography-driven vertical convection. The water flows into the boreholes from the north-northwest through fractures and flow tops and bases in the basalt exposed in surrounding
high terrains. Of six influx zones, three are water carrying fractures that strike N–S and dip E.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)296–314
Number of pages19
JournalGeothermics
Volume82
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Shallow-geothermal energy
  • Fractured basalt
  • Plateau basalt
  • Optical televiewer
  • Wireline logs
  • Faroe Islands

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Shallow geothermal energy in fractured basalt; a case study from Kollafjørður, Faroe Islands, NE-Atlantic Ocean'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this