Association between perfluoroalkyl substance exposure and asthma and allergic disease in children as modified by MMR vaccination

CAG Timmermann, E Budtz-Jorgensen, TK Jensen, CE Osuna, MS Petersen, U Steuerwald, F Nielsen, LK Poulsen, P Weihe, P Grandjean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)
2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are highly persistent chemicals that might be associated with asthma and allergy, but the associations remain unclear. Therefore, this study examined whether pre-and postnatal PFAS exposure was associated with childhood asthma and allergy. Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination in early life may have a protective effect against asthma and allergy, and MMR vaccination is therefore taken into account when evaluating these associations. In a cohort of Faroese children whose mothers were recruited during pregnancy, serum concentrations of five PFASs - Perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) - were measured at three timepoints (maternal serum in pregnancy week 34-36 and child serum at ages 5 and 13 years) and their association with immunoglobulin E (IgE) (cord blood and at age 7 years) and asthma/allergic diseases (questionnaires at ages 5 and 13 years and skin prick test at age 13 years) was determined. A total of 559 children were included in the analyses. Interactions with MMR vaccination were evaluated. Among 22 MMR-unvaccinated children, higher levels of the five PFASs at age 5 years were associated with increased odds of asthma at ages 5 and 13. The associations were reversed among MMR-vaccinated children. Prenatal PFAS exposure was not associated with childhood asthma or allergic diseases regardless of MMR vaccination status. In conclusion, PFAS exposure at age 5 was associated with increased risk of asthma among a small subgroup of MMR-unvaccinated children but not among MMR-vaccinated children. While PFAS exposure may impact immune system functions, this study suggests that MMR vaccination might be a potential effect-modifier.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-49
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Immunotoxicology
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017

Keywords

  • allergy
  • asthma
  • children
  • MMR vaccination
  • perfluoroalkyl substances
  • prenatal exposure
  • perfluorinated chemicals
  • sensitization
  • outcomes
  • diagnosis
  • cytokine
  • measles
  • health
  • acids
  • risk
  • vaccination

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Association between perfluoroalkyl substance exposure and asthma and allergic disease in children as modified by MMR vaccination'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this