Association between Maternal Fish Consumption and Gestational Weight Gain: Influence of Molecular Genetic Predisposition to Obesity

Sofus C Larsen, Lars Ängquist, Charles Laurin, Camilla S Morgen, Marianne U Jakobsen, Lavinia Paternoster, George Davey Smith, Sjurdur F Olsen, Thorkild I A Sørensen, Ellen A Nohr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Studies suggest that fish consumption can restrict weight gain. However, little is known about how fish consumption affects gestational weight gain (GWG), and whether this relationship depends on genetic makeup.OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between fish consumption and GWG, and whether this relationship is dependent on molecular genetic predisposition to obesity.DESIGN: A nested case-cohort study based on the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) sampling the most obese women (n = 990) and a random sample of the remaining participants (n = 1,128). Replication of statistically significant findings was attempted in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) (n = 4,841). We included 32 body mass index (BMI) associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 SNPs found associated with GWG. BMI associated SNPs were combined in a genetic risk score (GRS). Associations between consumption of fish, GRS or individual variants and GWG were analysed, and interactions between fish and the GRS or individual variants were examined.RESULTS: In the DNBC, each portion/week (150 g) of fatty fish was associated with a higher GWG of 0.58 kg (95% CI: 0.16, 0.99, P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalPloS one
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • diet
  • obesity
  • Body mass index
  • pregnancy
  • weight gain
  • human genetics
  • alcohol consumption
  • genetic predisposition

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